Canada

Will Canada meet its emissions reduction commitments made in Paris?

Will Canada meet its emissions reduction commitments made in Paris?

The Trudeau government’s first plan to combat climate change is short on measurable targets and meaningful action

On November 18, 2016, federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna released her plan to combat climate change, with a primary goal to stay beneath the scientifically determined limit of 2 degrees Celsius of planetwide warming.

The 91-page plan serves as a high-level road map toward reaching Canada's commitments made in Paris in December 2015 at the United Nations climate change conference (COP21). In essence, it is akin to the kind of strategy a business would implement during a transition period to more evolved business practices. The plan is a guideline that communicates Canada’s intent and direction on sectors including energy, agriculture and waste.

3 Reasons Why CETA Is Good for the Economy BUT Bad for the Environment

3 Reasons Why CETA Is Good for the Economy BUT Bad for the Environment

Last Wednesday, I was speaking at the French Vancouver Chamber of Commerce (Chambre de Commerce Française de Vancouver) and before my talk, the French ambassador to Canada, Nicolas Chapuis, stopped by to share his opinion about the Canada European Trade Agreement (CETA). He started his speech explaining about his earlier trip in the Canada’s North Baffin Island where he was shocked by the rapidly melting ice cap and lost wild life habitat. He pointed out how sad it was that the people who did not have anything to do with climate change were the first one severely impacted.